Types of motorcycles

Sport bikes, cruisers, scooters, and touring bikes are some of the many types of motorcycles.

There are many systems for classifying types of motorcycles, describing how the motorcycles are put to use, or the designer's intent, or some combination of the two.[1] Six main categories are widely recognized: cruiser, sport, touring, standard, dual-purpose, and dirt bike.[2][3][4][5] Sometimes sport touring motorcycles are recognized as a seventh category.[1] Strong lines are sometimes drawn between motorcycles and their smaller cousins, mopeds, scooters, and underbones,[6] but other classification schemes include these as types of motorcycles.[7]

There is no universal system for classifying all types of motorcycles. There are strict classification systems enforced by competitive motorcycle sport sanctioning bodies, or legal definitions of a motorcycle established by certain legal jurisdictions for motorcycle registration, emissions, road traffic safety rules or motorcyclist licensing. There are also informal classifications or nicknames used by manufacturers, riders, and the motorcycling media. Some experts do not recognize sub-types, like naked bike, that "purport to be classified" outside the six usual classes, because they fit within one of the main types and are recognizable only by cosmetic changes.[8]

  1. ^ a b Maher, Kevin; Greisler, Ben (1998), Chilton's Motorcycle Handbook, Haynes North America, pp. 2.2–2.18, ISBN 0-8019-9099-8
  2. ^ Cite error: The named reference Kresnak2008 was invoked but never defined (see the help page).
  3. ^ Cite error: The named reference Domino2009 was invoked but never defined (see the help page).
  4. ^ Cite error: The named reference Holmstrom2001 was invoked but never defined (see the help page).
  5. ^ McCraw, Jim (July 2005), "About That Bike…", Popular Mechanics, Hearst Magazines, vol. 182 no. 7, pp. 68–70, ISSN 0032-4558, retrieved 2010-06-04
  6. ^ Bennett, Jim (1995), The Complete Motorcycle Book: A Consumer's Guide, Facts on File, pp. 15–16, 19–25, ISBN 0-8160-2899-0
  7. ^ The MAIDS report, using the OECD Road Transport Research Programme methodology, uses the following nine classifications for motorcycles, mopeds, and scooters, providing one illustration of each: See:
    • International Coordinating Committee of the Expert Group for Motorcycle Accident Investigations (2001), Motorcycles: Common International Methodology for On-Scene, In-Depth Accident Investigation, Paris: Road Transport Research Programme; of the Directorate for Science Technology and Industry; of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development, OECD/DSTI/RTR/RS9/ICC
    • MAIDS (Motorcycle Accidents In Depth Study) Final Report 2.0, ACEM, the European Association of Motorcycle Manufacturers, April 2009, pp. 15–20
  8. ^ Broughton, Paul; Walker, Linda (May 6, 2009), Motorcycling and Leisure; Understanding the Recreational PTW Rider, Ashgate Publishing, Ltd., p. 7, ISBN 9780754675013, retrieved September 14, 2013