Milan

Milan

Milano  (Italian)
Comune di Milano
Clockwise from top: Porta Nuova, Sforza Castle, La Scala, Galleria Vittorio Emanuele II, Milano Centrale railway station, Arch of Peace and Milan Cathedral.
Coat of arms of Milan
Coat of arms
Milan is located in Lombardy
Milan
Milan
Milan is located in Italy
Milan
Milan
Milan is located in Europe
Milan
Milan
Coordinates: 45°28′01″N 09°11′24″E / 45.46694°N 9.19000°E / 45.46694; 9.19000Coordinates: 45°28′01″N 09°11′24″E / 45.46694°N 9.19000°E / 45.46694; 9.19000
CountryItaly
RegionLombardy
MetroMilan (MI)
Government
 • TypeStrong Mayor–Council
 • MayorGiuseppe Sala (EV)
 • LegislatureMilan City Council
Area
 • Comune181.76 km2 (70.18 sq mi)
Elevation
120 m (390 ft)
Population
 (February 28, 2020)[1]
 • Comune1,399,860
 • Density7,700/km2 (20,000/sq mi)
 • Metro4,336,121
Demonym(s)Milanese
Meneghino[3]
Time zoneUTC+1 (CET)
 • Summer (DST)UTC+2 (CEST)
Area code(s)0039 02
Websitewww.comune.milano.it

Milan (/mɪˈlæn/, US also /mɪˈlɑːn/,[4] Milanese: [miˈlãː] (About this soundlisten); Italian: Milano [miˈlaːno] (About this soundlisten))[5] is a city in northern Italy, capital of Lombardy, and the second-most populous city in Italy after Rome. Milan served as the capital of the Western Roman Empire, the Duchy of Milan and the Kingdom of Lombardy–Venetia. The city proper has a population of about 1.4 million[6] while its metropolitan city has 3.26 million inhabitants.[7] Its continuously built-up urban area, that stretches well beyond the boundaries of the administrative metropolitan city, is the fourth largest in the EU with 5.27 million inhabitants.[8] The population within the wider Milan metropolitan area, also known as Greater Milan, is estimated at 8.2 million, making it by far the largest metropolitan area in Italy and the 3rd largest in the EU.[9][10]

Milan is considered a leading alpha global city,[11] with strengths in the fields of art, commerce, design, education, entertainment, fashion, finance, healthcare, media, services, research and tourism. Its business district hosts Italy's stock exchange (Italian: Borsa Italiana), and the headquarters of national and international banks and companies. In terms of GDP, it has the second-largest economy among EU cities after Paris, and is the wealthiest among EU non-capital cities.[12][13] Milan is viewed as part of the Blue Banana and one of the "Four Motors for Europe".

The city has been recognized as one of the world's four fashion capitals[14] thanks to several international events and fairs, including Milan Fashion Week and the Milan Furniture Fair, which are currently among the world's biggest in terms of revenue, visitors and growth.[15][16][17] It hosted the Universal Exposition in 1906 and 2015. The city hosts numerous cultural institutions, academies and universities, with 11% of the national total of enrolled students.[18] Milan received 10 million visitors in 2018, with the largest numbers of foreign visitors coming from China, United States, France and Germany.[19][20] The tourists are attracted by Milan's museums and art galleries that include some of the most important collections in the world, including major works by Leonardo da Vinci. The city is served by many luxury hotels and is the fifth-most starred in the world by Michelin Guide.[21] Milan is also home to two of Europe's most successful football teams, A.C. Milan and F.C. Internazionale, and one of Europe's main basketball teams, Olimpia Milano. Milan will host the 2026 Winter Olympics together with Cortina d'Ampezzo.

  1. ^ "Resident population by age, nationality and borough". Comune di Milano.
  2. ^ "Database". ec.europa.eu. Eurostat. click General and regional statistics / Regional statistics by typology / Metropolitan regions / Demography statistics by metropolitan regions / Population on 1 January by broad age group, sex and metropolitan regions (met_pjanaggr3)
  3. ^ In reference to the Meneghino mask.
  4. ^ "Milan". Collins English Dictionary. HarperCollins. Retrieved 28 February 2019.; "Milan". Merriam-Webster Dictionary. Retrieved 28 February 2019.
  5. ^ Dizionario di toponomastica. Storia e significato dei nomi geografici italiani (in Italian). Torino: UTET. 1990.; "Milan map". explo-re.com. 2017.
  6. ^ "Statistiche demografiche ISTAT". demo.istat.it. Retrieved 23 November 2019.
  7. ^ "Public Data". istat.it.
  8. ^ Cite error: The named reference Demographia was invoked but never defined (see the help page).
  9. ^ "Le aree metropolitane in Italia occupano il 9 per cento del territorio – Università degli Studi di Milano-Bicocca". www.old.unimib.it (in Italian). 6 December 2013.[permanent dead link]
  10. ^ *"OECD Territorial Reviews: Milan, Italy" (PDF). OECD. Retrieved 13 October 2017.[permanent dead link]
  11. ^ "GaWC - The World According to GaWC 2018". www.lboro.ac.uk. Retrieved 16 December 2019.
  12. ^ Gert-Jan Hospers (2002). "Beyond the Blue Banana? Structural Change in Europe's Geo-Economy" (PDF). 42nd EUROPEAN CONGRESS of the Regional Science Association Young Scientist Session – Submission for EPAINOS Award 27–31 August 2002 – Dortmund, Germany. Archived from the original (PDF) on 29 September 2007. Retrieved 27 September 2006.
  13. ^ "Global city GDP 2013–2014". Brookings Institution. Archived from the original on 6 January 2013. Retrieved 8 May 2015.
  14. ^ Shaw, Catherine (17 July 2016). "Milan, the 'world's design capital', takes steps to attract visitors year-round". South China Morning Post. Retrieved 15 October 2017.
  15. ^ "Fashion". The Global Language Monitor. Archived from the original on 3 June 2011. Retrieved 1 June 2011.
  16. ^ "Milan, Italy | frog". Frogdesign.com. Archived from the original on 1 May 2011. Retrieved 1 June 2011.
  17. ^ "Milan Furniture Fair". Monocle.com. 30 April 2009. Archived from the original on 13 July 2012. Retrieved 10 July 2012.
  18. ^ "University and research in Milan". Province of Milan. Archived from the original on 13 May 2013. Retrieved 4 November 2012.
  19. ^ "Milano sempre più meta turistica, anche nel 2018 sono cresciuti i visitatori: il 16% è cinese". MilanoToday (in Italian). Retrieved 23 April 2021.
  20. ^ "Milano, inarrestabile boom di turisti: nel 2018 sfiorano il tetto dei 10 milioni". MilanoToday (in Italian). Retrieved 23 April 2021.
  21. ^ "Guida Michelin 2016: ristoranti stellati in Lombardia". Archived from the original on 2 May 2016. Retrieved 7 May 2016.