Advent

Advent
Advent2007candlelight.JPG
Lighting the candles of an Advent wreath in a church service
Observed byChristians
TypeChristian, cultural
SignificancePreparation for the commemoration of the birth of Jesus
ObservancesChurch services, completing an Advent calendar and Advent wreath,[1] praying through a daily devotional,[1] erecting a Chrismon tree,[1] hanging of the greens,[1] lighting a Christingle,[2] gift giving, family and other social gatherings
BeginsFourth or (in the Ambrosian and Mozarabic Rites) sixth Sunday before Christmas
2020 date29 November
2021 date28 November
2022 date27 November
2023 date3 December
FrequencyAnnual
Related toChristmastide, Christmas Eve, Annunciation, Epiphany, Epiphanytide, Baptism of the Lord, Nativity Fast, Nativity of Jesus

Advent is a season of the liturgical year observed in most Christian denominations as a time of expectant waiting and preparation for both the celebration of the Nativity of Christ at Christmas and the return of Christ at the Second Coming. Advent is the beginning of the liturgical year in Western Christianity, and is part of the wider Christmas and holiday season.

The term "Advent" is also used in Eastern Orthodoxy for the 40-day Nativity Fast, which has practices different from those in the West.[3]

The name was adopted from Latin adventus "coming; arrival", translating Greek parousia. In the New Testament, this is the term used for the Second Coming of Christ. Thus, the season of Advent in the Christian calendar anticipates the "coming of Christ" from three different perspectives: the physical nativity in Bethlehem, the reception of Christ in the heart of the believer, and the eschatological Second Coming.[4]

Practices associated with Advent include keeping an Advent calendar, lighting an Advent wreath, praying an Advent daily devotional,[1] erecting a Christmas tree or a Chrismon tree,[1] lighting a Christingle,[2] as well as other ways of preparing for Christmas, such as setting up Christmas decorations,[5][6][7] a custom that is sometimes done liturgically through a hanging of the greens ceremony.[1][8] The equivalent of Advent in Eastern Christianity is called the Nativity Fast, but it differs in length and observances, and does not begin the liturgical church year as it does in the West. The Eastern Nativity Fast does not use the equivalent parousia in its preparatory services.[9]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g Kennedy, Rodney Wallace; Hatch, Derek C (27 August 2013). Baptists at Work in Worship. Wipf and Stock Publishers. p. 147. ISBN 978-1-62189-843-6. There are a variety or worship practices that enable a congregation to celebrate Advent: lighting an advent wreath, a hanging of the greens service, a Chrismon tree, and an Advent devotional booklet.
  2. ^ a b Geddes, Gordon; Griffiths, Jane (2001). Christianity. Heinemann. p. 99. ISBN 978-0-435-30695-3. Many churches hold Christingle services during Advent. Children are given a Christingle.adaa
  3. ^ perspective., Articles on moral / morality from Orthodox Christian. "Fr. Patrick Henry Reardon -- The Origins of Advent". orthodoxytoday.org. Retrieved 15 November 2017.
  4. ^ "since the time of Bernard of Clairvaux (d.1153), Christians have spoken of the three comings of Christ: in the flesh in Bethlehem, in our hearts daily, and in glory at the end of time" Pfatteicher, Philip H. (23 September 2013). Journey into the Heart of God: Living the Liturgical Year. Oxford University Press. ISBN 9780199997145 – via Google Books.
  5. ^ The Lutheran Witness. 80. Concordia Publishing House. 1961.
  6. ^ Michelin (10 October 2012). Germany Green Guide Michelin 2012–2013. Michelin. p. 73. ISBN 9782067182110. Advent – The four weeks before Christmas are celebrated by counting down the days with an advent calendar, hanging up Christmas decorations and lightning an additional candle every Sunday on the four-candle advent wreath.
  7. ^ Normark, Helena (1997). Modern Christmas. Graphic Garden. Christmas in Sweden starts with Advent, which is the await for the arrival of Jesus. The symbol for it is the Advent candlestick with four candles in it, and we light one more candle for each of the four Sundays before Christmas. Most people start putting up the Christmas decorations on the first of Advent.
  8. ^ Rice, Howard L.; Huffstutler, James C. (1 January 2001). Reformed Worship. Westminster John Knox Press. p. 197. ISBN 978-0-664-50147-1. Another popular activity is the "Hanging of the Greens," a service in which the sanctuary is decorated for Christmas.
  9. ^ "Four Reasons It's Not 'Advent.'". Kevin (Basil) Fritts. Retrieved 29 September 2014.