Nickelodeon

Nickelodeon
Nickelodeon 2009 logo.svg
CountryUnited States
Broadcast areaNationwide
HeadquartersOne Astor Plaza, New York City
Programming
Language(s)English
Picture format1080i HDTV
(downscaled to letterboxed 480i for the SDTV feed)
Ownership
OwnerViacomCBS Domestic Media Networks
Sister channels
History
LaunchedDecember 1, 1977 (1977-12-01) (as QUBE's C-3 channel)
April 1, 1979 (1979-04-01) (as Nickelodeon)
Links
Websitewww.nick.com
Availability
(channel space shared with nighttime programming block Nick at Nite)
Cable
Available on most cable systemsVaries by cable provider
Verizon Fios
  • Channel 252 (SD East)
  • Channel 752 (HD)
Satellite
DirecTV
  • Channel 299 (East, HD/SD)
  • Channel 300 (West, SD)
  • Channel 1300 (VOD)
Dish Network
  • Channel 170 (East, HD/SD)
  • Channel 171 (West, SD)
C bandAMC 11 - Channel 64 (West) (4DTV Digital)
IPTV
AT&T U-verse
  • Channel 314 (East, SD)
  • Channel 1314 (East, HD)
Google FiberChannel slots may vary
Streaming media
Philo, FuboTV, YouTube TV, Hulu + Live TV

Nickelodeon (often shortened to Nick) is an American pay television channel which was first tested on December 1, 1977,[1] until it eventually launched on April 1, 1979 as the first cable channel for children.[2] It is owned by ViacomCBS through its domestic networks division and is based in New York City. The network's programming is primarily aimed at children aged 2–17,[3] while some of its program blocks target a broader family audience.

The channel was first tested in 1977 as part of QUBE,[4] an early cable television system broadcast locally in Columbus, Ohio.[5] QUBE's Channel C-3 aired Pinwheel, an educational show developed by Vivian Horner. Pinwheel performed well with QUBE subscribers, and Horner sought to expand her program into a full channel on national television. The channel, now named Nickelodeon, launched to a new countrywide audience on April 1, 1979,[6] with Pinwheel as its inaugural program.[5] The network was initially commercial-free and remained without advertising until 1984.[7] QUBE's owner, Warner-Amex Satellite Entertainment, eventually sold Nickelodeon, along with its sister networks MTV and VH1, to Viacom in 1986.[8]

Throughout its history, Nickelodeon has introduced sister channels and themed programming blocks. On January 4, 1988, Nickelodeon launched Nick Jr., a weekday-morning block aimed at preschool children. On August 11, 1991, the network introduced another flagship brand, the Nicktoons: original animated productions created specifically for the network.[9] The Nicktoons brand would eventually evolve to introduce its own sister channel, launched in 2002. In 1999, Nickelodeon partnered with Sesame Workshop to create Noggin,[10] an educational brand consisting of a cable channel and an interactive website. Two blocks aimed at a teenage audience, TEENick (previously on Nickelodeon) and The N (previously on Noggin) were merged into a standalone channel, TeenNick, in 2009.

As of September 2018, the channel is available to about 87.167 million households in the United States.[11]

  1. ^ Julie Young (May 28, 2013). The Famous Faces of Indy's WTTV-4. Arcadia Publishing Incorporated. p. 105. ISBN 978-1-62584-506-1.
  2. ^ Hendershot 2004, p. 165.
  3. ^ Hemsworth, Aaron (January 3, 2018). "Viacom's Nickelodeon Remains Driving Force for Media Segment". Yahoo! Finance. Archived from the original on January 8, 2018. Retrieved January 8, 2018.
  4. ^ Hendershot 2004, pp. 15–16.
  5. ^ a b "QUBE Interactive Television History: It Came From Columbus". Tedium: The Dull Side of the Internet. Retrieved September 30, 2020.
  6. ^ Jay Bobbin. "Nickelodeon 20th Birthday from Green Slime to Prime Time, The Kids Network Celebrates with Lots of Special Events", The Buffalo News, June 20, 1999. Retrieved March 10, 2011 from HighBeam Research.
  7. ^ Dudek, Duane (September 2, 1983). "Cable's Nickelodeon is all for the children". Milwaukee Sentinel. Retrieved December 27, 2018.
  8. ^ Hendershot 2004, p. 21–22.
  9. ^ "The Oral History of 'Nicktoons', Part I: How The Storied Animation Block Came To Be". Decider. June 14, 2016.
  10. ^ Hall, Jane (April 29, 1998). "Educational Outlet for Children is Announced". The Los Angeles Times.
  11. ^ "Nielsen coverage estimates for September see gains at ESPN networks, NBCSN, and NBA TV, drops at MLBN and NFLN". awfulannouncing.comm. Archived from the original on August 19, 2019. Retrieved July 28, 2019.