Charlotte, North Carolina

Charlotte, North Carolina
City of Charlotte
From top to bottom, left to right: Charlotte skyline, UNC Charlotte, NASCAR Hall of Fame, Spectrum Center, Bank of America Stadium, Romare Bearden Park
From top to bottom, left to right: Charlotte skyline, UNC Charlotte, NASCAR Hall of Fame, Spectrum Center, Bank of America Stadium, Romare Bearden Park
Nicknames: 
The Queen City, The QC, The CLT, The Hornet's Nest[1]
Location within Mecklenburg County
Location within Mecklenburg County
Charlotte is located in North Carolina
Charlotte
Charlotte
Location within North Carolina
Charlotte is located in the United States
Charlotte
Charlotte
Location within the United States
Charlotte is located in North America
Charlotte
Charlotte
Location within North America
Coordinates: 35°13′38″N 80°50′35″W / 35.22722°N 80.84306°W / 35.22722; -80.84306Coordinates: 35°13′38″N 80°50′35″W / 35.22722°N 80.84306°W / 35.22722; -80.84306[2]
Country United States
State North Carolina
County Mecklenburg
MetroCharlotte–Concord–Gastonia
Settled1755
Incorporated1768
Named forCharlotte of Mecklenburg-Strelitz
Government
 • TypeCouncil-manager
 • BodyCity Council of Charlotte, North Carolina
 • MayorVi Lyles (D)
Area
 • City309.25 sq mi (800.94 km2)
 • Land307.26 sq mi (795.80 km2)
 • Water1.98 sq mi (5.14 km2)
Elevation761 ft (232 m)
Population
 (2010)
 • City731,424
 • Estimate 
(2019)[4]
885,708
 • Rank1st in North Carolina
15th in United States
 • Density2,882.59/sq mi (1,112.98/km2)
 • Urban
1,249,442 (38th)
 • Metro
2,636,883 (22nd)
Demonym(s)Charlottean
Time zoneUTC−5 (EST)
 • Summer (DST)UTC−4 (EDT)
ZIP code
28201-28237, 28240-28247, 28250, 28253-28256, 28258, 28260-28262, 28265-28266, 28269-28275, 28277-28278, 28280-28290, 28296-28297, 28299
Area codes704, 980
FIPS code37-12000[5]
Major AirportCharlotte Douglas International Airport
InterstatesI-77.svg I-85.svg I-277.svg I-485.svg
Rapid TransitCharlotte Area Transit System
Websitecharlottenc.gov
Warning: Page using Template:Infobox settlement with unknown parameter "area_magnitude" (this message is shown only in preview).

Charlotte (/ˈʃɑːrlɪt/) is the most populous city in the U.S. state of North Carolina. Located in the Piedmont region, it is the county seat of Mecklenburg County. In 2019, the U.S. Census Bureau estimated the population was 885,708,[6] making it the 15th-most populous city in the U.S. and the second-largest in the Southeast behind Jacksonville, Florida. The city is the cultural, economic, and transportation center of the Charlotte metropolitan area, whose population ranks 22nd in the U.S., and had a population of 2,569,213, in 2018.[5] The Charlotte metropolitan area is part of a sixteen-county market region or combined statistical area with a 2018 census-estimated population of 2,728,933.[7]

Between 2004 and 2014, Charlotte was ranked as the country's fastest-growing metro area, with 888,000 new residents.[8] Based on U.S. Census data from 2005 to 2015, Charlotte tops the U.S. in millennial population growth.[9] It is the third-fastest-growing major city in the United States.[10] It is listed as a "Gamma +" global city by the Globalization and World Cities Research Network.[11] Residents are referred to as "Charlotteans".[12]

Charlotte is home to the corporate headquarters of Bank of America, Truist Financial, and the east coast operations of Wells Fargo, which along with other financial institutions has made it the second-largest banking center in the United States since 1995.[13]

Among Charlotte's many notable attractions, some of the most popular include the Carolina Panthers (NFL), the Charlotte Hornets (NBA), the NASCAR All-Star Race, the Wells Fargo Championship, the NASCAR Hall of Fame, the Charlotte Ballet, Children's Theatre of Charlotte, Carowinds amusement park, and the U.S. National Whitewater Center.

Charlotte has a humid subtropical climate. It is located several miles east of the Catawba River and southeast of Lake Norman, the largest man-made lake in North Carolina. Lake Wylie and Mountain Island Lake are two smaller man-made lakes located near the city.

  1. ^ "The Mecklenburg Historical Association, Charlotte, NC". meckdec.org. Archived from the original on June 10, 2020. Retrieved June 22, 2020.
  2. ^ a b c "Charlotte, North Carolina". Geographic Names Information System. United States Geological Survey.
  3. ^ "2019 U.S. Gazetteer Files". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved July 27, 2020.
  4. ^ Cite error: The named reference USCensusEst2019 was invoked but never defined (see the help page).
  5. ^ a b "Annual Estimates of the Resident Population: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2018". U.S. Census Bureau, Population Division. April 2019. Archived from the original on February 13, 2020. Retrieved June 30, 2019.
  6. ^ "Annual Estimates of the Resident Population for Incorporated Places of 50,000 or More, Ranked by July 1, 2019 Population: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2019". United States Census Bureau, Population Division. Retrieved May 21, 2020.
  7. ^ "Annual Estimates of the Resident Population: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2018". U.S. Census Bureau. U.S. Census Bureau, Population Division. Archived from the original on February 13, 2020. Retrieved June 30, 2019.
  8. ^ "Here's Why Charlotte Became The Fastest Growing City in The Country Over The Past Decade". May 2017.
  9. ^ "Millennial magnet: Charlotte ranks as top city in young-adult population growth". November 2016.
  10. ^ Balk, Gene (May 22, 2014). "Census: Seattle is the fastest-growing big city in the U.S." The Seattle Times. FYI Guy. Archived from the original on February 22, 2018. Retrieved November 28, 2014.
  11. ^ "The World According to GaWC 2020". GaWC - Research Network. Globalization and World Cities. Retrieved August 31, 2020.
  12. ^ Staff, CharlotteFive (March 21, 2018). "31 signs you're a native Charlottean". The Charlotte Observer. Archived from the original on June 25, 2020. Retrieved June 22, 2020.
  13. ^ O'Daniel, Adam (September 4, 2012). "So how did Charlotte become a banking center?". Charlotte Business Journal. The Business Journals. Retrieved June 23, 2015.