1939 New York World's Fair

1939 New York City
1939fairhelicline.jpg
Overview
BIE-classUniversal exposition
CategorySecond category General Exposition
NameNew York World's Fair
MottoThe World of Tomorrow
Area1,202 acres (486 hectares)
Organized byGrover Whalen
Participant(s)
Countries33
Location
CountryUnited States
CityNew York City
VenueFlushing Meadows–Corona Park
Coordinates40°44′38.5″N 73°50′39.9″W / 40.744028°N 73.844417°W / 40.744028; -73.844417
Timeline
OpeningApril 30, 1939 (1939-04-30)[1]
ClosureOctober 27, 1940 (1940-10-27)
Universal expositions
PreviousExposition Internationale des Arts et Techniques dans la Vie Moderne in Paris
NextExposition internationale du bicentenaire de Port-au-Prince in Port-au-Prince
Specialized Expositions
PreviousSecond International Aeronautic Exhibition in Helsinki
NextInternational Exhibition on Urbanism and Housing (1947) in Paris
Simultaneous
UniversalGolden Gate International Exposition
SpecializedExposition internationale de l'eau in Liège

The 1939–40 New York World's Fair was a world's fair held at Flushing Meadows–Corona Park in Queens, New York, United States. It was the second-most expensive American world's fair of all time, exceeded only by St. Louis's Louisiana Purchase Exposition of 1904. Many countries around the world participated in it, and over 44 million people attended its exhibits in two seasons.[2] It was the first exposition to be based on the future, with an opening slogan of "Dawn of a New Day", and it allowed all visitors to take a look at "the world of tomorrow".

When World War II began four months into the 1939 World's Fair, many exhibits were affected, especially those on display in the pavilions of countries under Axis occupation. After the close of the fair in 1940, many exhibits were demolished or removed, though some buildings were retained for the 1964–1965 New York World's Fair, held at the same site.

  1. ^ "1939 New York World's Fair". www.1939nyworldsfair.com. Archived from the original on March 23, 2019. Retrieved January 10, 2011.
  2. ^ Herman, Arthur. Freedom's Forge: How American Business Produced Victory in World War II, p. 58, Random House, New York, 2012. ISBN 978-1-4000-6964-4.