Wendell Phillips

Wendell Phillips
A daguerrotype by Mathew Brady of Wendell Phillips in his forties
A daguerrotype by Mathew Brady of Wendell Phillips in his forties
Born(1811-11-29)November 29, 1811
DiedFebruary 2, 1884(1884-02-02) (aged 72)
Boston, Massachusetts, U.S.
Burial placeGranary Burying Ground
Alma materBoston Latin School
Harvard University
Harvard Law School
OccupationAttorney
Known forAbolitionism, advocacy for Native Americans
Parent(s)Sarah Walley
John Phillips

Wendell Phillips (November 29, 1811 – February 2, 1884) was an American abolitionist, advocate for Native Americans, orator, and attorney.

According to George Lewis Ruffin, a Black attorney, Phillips was seen by many Blacks as "the one white American wholly color-blind and free from race prejudice".[1] According to another Black attorney, Archibald Grimké, as an abolitionist leader he is ahead of Wm. Lloyd Garrison and Charles Sumner. From 1850 to 1865 he was the "preëminent figure" in American abolitionism.[2]

  1. ^ Ruffin, George L (1884). "Introductory remarks". A eulogy on Wendell Phillips : Delivered in Tremont Temple, Boston, April 9, 1884. Together with the proceedings incident thereto, letters, etc. Boston. p. 7. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  2. ^ Grimké, Archibald (1884). A eulogy on Wendell Phillips : Delivered in Tremont Temple, Boston, April 9, 1884. Together with the proceedings incident thereto, letters, etc. Boston. p. 35. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)