Back

Beriah Green

Beriah Green, Jr. (March 24, 1795 – May 4, 1874) was an American reformer, abolitionist, temperance advocate, college professor, minister, and head of the Oneida Institute. He was "consumed totally by his abolitionist views".[1]:281 He has been described as "cantankerous".[2]:xv Former student Alexander Crummell described him as a "bluff, kind-hearted man," a "master-thinker".[2]:49

Greene was born in Preston, Connecticut, son of Beriah Green (1774–1865) and Elizabeth Smith (1771–1840). His father was a cabinet and chair maker.[2]:3–4

The family moved to Pawlet, Vermont in 1810,[3] and he may have attended the Pawlet Academy.[2]:6 In 1815 he enrolled in the Kimball Union Academy, in New Hampshire.[4]:52–53 He graduated from Middlebury College in 1819, where he was valedictorian,[3] and then studied to become a missionary (minister) at Andover Theological Seminary (1819–20). However, his religious beliefs did not agree with any denominational creed.

  1. ^ Perkins, Linda M. (1987). "Review of Abolition's axe : Beriah Green, Oneida Institute, and the Black freedom struggle, by Milton C. Sernett". History of Education Quarterly (2): 281–282. doi:10.2307/368480. JSTOR 368480.
  2. ^ a b c d Sernett, Milton C. (1986). Abolition's axe : Beriah Green, Oneida Institute, and the Black freedom struggle. Syracuse University Press. ISBN 9780815623700.
  3. ^ a b "Beriah Green". Dictionary of American Biography. Charles Scribner's Sons. 1936 – via Gale Biography in Context.
  4. ^ Cite error: The named reference Sorin was invoked but never defined (see the help page).