Reining

Reining
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A competitor performing the sliding stop, one of the signature moves of a reining horse
Highest governing bodyInternational Federation for Equestrian Sports (FEI)
First playedUnited States
Characteristics
Contactno
Team membersindividual and team at international levels
Mixed genderyes
Typeindoor or outdoor
Equipmenthorse, western saddle and related horse tack
VenueArena indoor or outdoor with dirt or similar footing suitable for the horse
Presence
Country or regionWorldwide

Reining is a western riding competition for horses where the riders guide the horses through a precise pattern of circles, spins, and stops. Reining is also considered to be a lot like figure skating. All work is done at the lope (a slow, relaxed version of the horse gait more commonly known worldwide as the canter), or the gallop (the fastest of the horse gaits). Originating from working cattle, reining is often described as a Western form of dressage riding, as it requires the horse to be responsive and in tune with its rider, whose aids should not be easily seen, and judges the horse on its ability to perform a set pattern of movements. The horse should be willingly guided or controlled with little or no apparent resistance and dictated to completely. A horse that pins his ears, conveying a threat to his rider, refuses to go forward, runs sideways, bounces his rear, wrings his tail in irritation or displays an overall poor attitude is not being guided willingly, and is judged accordingly.[1]

  1. ^ Kinsey, Mike; Jennifer Denison (2008). Backcountry Basics. Colorado Springs, CO: Western Horseman. p. 8. ISBN 0-911647-84-8.