Peter Lorre

Peter Lorre
PeterLorre.jpg
Portrait of Lorre by Karsh of Ottawa, 1946
Born
László Löwenstein

(1904-06-26)26 June 1904
Died23 March 1964(1964-03-23) (aged 59)
Resting placeHollywood Forever Cemetery
OccupationActor
Years active1929–1964
Spouse(s)
(m. 1934; div. 1945)

(m. 1945; div. 1950)

Anne Marie Brenning
(m. 1953)
Children1

Peter Lorre (born László Löwenstein; 26 June 1904 – 23 March 1964) was a Hungarian-American actor. Lorre began his stage career in Vienna before moving to Germany where he worked first on the stage, then in film in Berlin in the late 1920s and early 1930s. Lorre caused an international sensation in the Weimar Republic-era film M (1931), directed by Fritz Lang, in which he portrayed a serial killer who preys on little girls.

Of Jewish descent, Lorre left Germany when Adolf Hitler came to power. His second English-language film, following the multiple-language version of M (1931), was Alfred Hitchcock's The Man Who Knew Too Much (1934) made in Great Britain.[1][2] Eventually settling in Hollywood, he later became a featured player in many Hollywood crime and mystery films. In his initial American films, Mad Love and Crime and Punishment (both 1935), he continued to play murderers, but he was then cast playing Mr. Moto, the Japanese detective, in a B-picture series.

From 1941 to 1946, he mainly worked for Warner Bros. His first film at Warner was The Maltese Falcon (1941), the first of many films in which he appeared alongside actors Humphrey Bogart and Sydney Greenstreet. This was followed by Casablanca (1942), the second of the nine films in which Lorre and Greenstreet appeared together. Lorre's other films include Frank Capra's Arsenic and Old Lace (1944) and Disney's 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea (1954). Frequently typecast as a sinister foreigner, his later career was erratic. Lorre was the first actor to play a James Bond villain as Le Chiffre in a TV version of Casino Royale (1954). Some of his last roles were in horror films directed by Roger Corman.

  1. ^ "Multiple-Language Version Film Collectors' Guide: M (1931)". Brenton Film.
  2. ^ "Alfred Hitchcock Collectors' Guide: The Man Who Knew Too Much (1934)". Brenton Film.