Extended play

Extended-play vinyl record

An extended play record, usually referred to as an EP, is a musical recording that contains more tracks than a single but less than an album or LP record.[1][2][3] Contemporary EPs generally contain four or five tracks, and are considered "less expensive and time-consuming" for an artist to produce than an album.[3] An EP originally referred to specific types of records other than 78 rpm standard play (SP) and LP,[4] but it is now applied to mid-length CDs and downloads as well.[5]

Ricardo Baca of The Denver Post said, "EPs—originally extended-play 'single' releases that are shorter than traditional albums—have long been popular with punk and indie bands."[6] In the United Kingdom, the Official Chart Company defines a boundary between EP and album classification at 25 minutes of maximum length and no more than four tracks (not counting alternative versions of featured songs, if present).[1][2]

  1. ^ a b Austin, Chris; Blyth, Lucy (March 2015). "Rules for Chart Eligibility – Singles" (PDF). Official Charts Company. Retrieved March 21, 2017.
  2. ^ a b Austin, Chris; Blyth, Lucy (March 2015). "Rules for Chart Eligibility – Albums" (PDF). Official Charts Company. Retrieved March 21, 2017.
  3. ^ a b Fuhr, Michael (2015). Globalization and Popular Music in South Korea: Sounding Out K-Pop. Routledge. ISBN 9781317556909. Retrieved March 21, 2017. Mini-albums and EPs are shorter than full-length albums and usually contain four or five songs [...] They are less expensive and time-consuming in production than albums, and they help to popularize new groups who otherwise lack the number of songs required for a full-length album.
  4. ^ Maes, Jan; Vercammen, Marc (2001). Digital Audio Technology: A Guide to CD, MiniDisc, SACD, DVD(A), MP3 and DAT (4th ed.). Focal Press. p. 2. ISBN 9780240516547. Retrieved June 20, 2014.
  5. ^ Malcolm Tatum. "What Is an Extended Play?". wisegeek.
  6. ^ Baca, Ricardo (January 4, 2010). "As albums fade away, music industry looks to shorter records". The Denver Post. Chattanooga Times Free Press. Retrieved July 21, 2010.