Brisbane

Brisbane
Queensland
Skyline
Story Bridge and Citycat
City Hall
South Bank Parklands
Queenslander
Panoramasouthbank.jpg
Map of the Brisbane metropolitan area
Map of the Brisbane metropolitan area
Brisbane is located in Australia
Brisbane
Brisbane
Coordinates27°28′04″S 153°01′41″E / 27.46778°S 153.02806°E / -27.46778; 153.02806Coordinates: 27°28′04″S 153°01′41″E / 27.46778°S 153.02806°E / -27.46778; 153.02806
Population2,560,700 (2020)[1] (3rd)
 • Density155/km2 (400/sq mi)
Established13 May 1825 (1825-05-13)
Area15,842 km2 (6,116.6 sq mi)[2][3] (2016 GCCSA)
Time zoneAEST (UTC+10:00)
Location
LGA(s)
RegionSouth East Queensland
CountyStanley, Canning, Cavendish, Churchill, Ward
State electorate(s)41 divisions
Federal Division(s)17 divisions
Mean max temp Mean min temp Annual rainfall
25.4 °C
78 °F
15.7 °C
60 °F
1,036 mm
40.8 in

Brisbane (/ˈbrɪzbən/ (About this soundlisten) BRIZ-bən[9]) is the capital of and most populous city in the Australian state of Queensland,[10] and the third most populous city in Australia. Brisbane's metropolitan area has a population of approximately 2.6 million,[11] and it lies at the centre of the South East Queensland metropolitan region, which encompasses a population of approximately 3.8 million.[12] The Brisbane central business district is situated inside a peninsula of the Brisbane River, about 15 kilometres (9 miles) from its mouth at Moreton Bay, a bay of the Coral Sea.[13] The metropolitan area extends in all directions along the hilly floodplain of the Brisbane River Valley between Moreton Bay and the Taylor and D'Aguilar mountain ranges. It sprawls across several of Australia's most populous local government areas (LGAs)—most centrally the City of Brisbane, the most populous LGA in the nation. The demonym of Brisbane is "Brisbanite",[14][15] while common nicknames include "Brissy" and "River City".[16]

One of the oldest cities in Australia, Brisbane was founded upon the traditional lands of the Turrbal people[17] who named the area Meanjin. The city is named for the Brisbane River on which it stands, which is in turn named for Sir Thomas Brisbane, the Governor of New South Wales at the time of the city's founding.[10] The Moreton Bay penal settlement was founded in 1824 at Redcliffe as a place for secondary offenders from the Sydney colony, and soon moved to North Quay in 1825, opening to free settlement in 1842. Brisbane was chosen as the capital when Queensland separated from New South Wales in 1859. During World War II, Brisbane played a central role in the Allied campaign and served as the South West Pacific headquarters for United States Army General Douglas MacArthur.[18]

A diverse city with 32.2% of its metropolitan population being foreign born,[19] Brisbane is classified as a global city (Beta +),[20][21] and ranks highly in ratings of liveable cities.[22][23][24] Brisbane is known for its distinct Queenslander architecture, and its outdoor dining and cuisine culture. Brisbane was also the origin of the Anzac Day tradition through the works of Canon David John Garland. A transportation hub, Brisbane is served by a large suburban rail network, popular bus and ferry networks as well as Australia's third-busiest airport and seaport. Brisbane has hosted major events including the 1982 Commonwealth Games, World Expo 88 and the 2014 G20 summit. While a final announcement has not been made, due to being awarded "preferred bidder" status by the International Olympic Committee, Brisbane will likely host the 2032 Summer Olympics.[25][26]

Brisbane is a popular tourist destination. Major landmarks and attractions include South Bank Parklands, the Queensland Cultural Centre (home to the Queensland Museum, the Queensland Art Gallery, the Gallery of Modern Art and other institutions), the Story Bridge, Fortitude Valley, the Riverwalk network, the D'Aguilar National Park, Lone Pine Koala Sanctuary, Mount Coot-tha Reserve and Moreton Bay.

  1. ^ https://www.abs.gov.au/statistics/people/population/regional-population/2019-20
  2. ^ "2016 Census Community Profile – Greater Brisbane (3GBRI – GCCSA)". Australian Bureau of Statistics. Archived from the original on 14 July 2017.
  3. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 14 July 2017. Retrieved 2 July 2017.CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link), ZIPed Excel spreadsheet. Cover
  4. ^ "Great Circle Distance between Brisbane and Sydney". Geoscience Australia. March 2004. Archived from the original on 7 February 2016. Retrieved 17 January 2016.
  5. ^ "Great Circle Distance between Brisbane and Canberra". Geoscience Australia. March 2004. Archived from the original on 7 February 2016. Retrieved 17 January 2016.
  6. ^ "Great Circle Distance between Brisbane and Melbourne". Geoscience Australia. March 2004. Archived from the original on 7 February 2016. Retrieved 17 January 2016.
  7. ^ "Great Circle Distance between Brisbane and Adelaide". Geoscience Australia. March 2004. Archived from the original on 7 February 2016. Retrieved 17 January 2016.
  8. ^ "Great Circle Distance between Brisbane and Perth". Geoscience Australia. March 2004. Archived from the original on 7 February 2016. Retrieved 17 January 2016.
  9. ^ Macquarie Dictionary. The Macquarie Library. 2003. p. 121. ISBN 1-876429-37-2.
  10. ^ a b "Brisbane (entry 4555)". Queensland Place Names. Queensland Government. Retrieved 14 March 2014.
  11. ^ "3218.0 – Regional Population Growth, Australia, 2019–20". Australian Bureau of Statistics. 30 March 2021. Retrieved 5 April 2021.
  12. ^ "Population Estimates by Local Government Area, 2019 to 2020". Australian Bureau of Statistics. 1 March 2021. Retrieved 5 April 2021.
  13. ^ "Brisbane and Greater Brisbane". Queensland Places. Archived from the original on 27 January 2014.
  14. ^ Kent, Lucinda (21 March 2014). "Is this the average Brisbanite?". ABC Radio Brisbane. Australian Broadcasting Corporation. Archived from the original on 31 August 2014. Retrieved 20 April 2019.
  15. ^ "Names for where we're from". ABC Radio National. Australian Broadcasting Corporation. 13 October 2012. Retrieved 20 April 2019.
  16. ^ Scott, Noel; Clark, Stephen (2006). "The Development and Tracking of a Branding Campaign for Brisbane". In Prideaux, Bruce; Moscardo, Gianna; Laws, Eric (eds.). Managing Tourism and Hospitality Services: Theory and International Applications. CABI. ISBN 9781845930158.
  17. ^ "Tom Petrie's Early Reminiscences of Early Queensland". Archived from the original on 1 September 2013. Retrieved 24 November 2008.
  18. ^ "South West Pacific campaign". www.ww2places.qld.gov.au. Queensland Government. Archived from the original on 5 February 2016. Retrieved 22 January 2016.
  19. ^ "2016 Census Community Profiles: Greater Brisbane". Australian Bureau of Statistics. 23 October 2017. Retrieved 1 April 2020.
  20. ^ "The World According to GaWC 2020". GaWC – Research Network. Globalization and World Cities. Retrieved 31 August 2020.
  21. ^ Schroders Global Cities IndexSchroders, 2019
  22. ^ "Australia falls from top 10 Quality of Living ranking". Mercer. 13 March 2019. Retrieved 1 April 2020.
  23. ^ "Announced: Melbourne Remains the World's Second Most Liveable City". Broadsheet. 4 September 2019. Retrieved 1 April 2020.
  24. ^ https://amp.couriermail.com.au/news/queensland/brisbane-moves-up-liveability-index-but-trails-other-aussie-cities/news-story/61fc6ced3c92d6c85af1a7e98f084acc&ved=2ahUKEwi594jPh7zlAhWkmOYKHQMgAa0QFjAKegQIBxAL&usg=AOvVaw1i12Wvljn4Qt4CpWlyUk_h&ampcf=1
  25. ^ "Australian bid put on IOC fast track to host 2032 Olympics". The Independent. 24 February 2021. Retrieved 28 February 2021.
  26. ^ "Brisbane and AOC invited to targeted dialogue for the Olympic Games 2032 - Olympic News". International Olympic Committee. 25 February 2021. Retrieved 28 February 2021.