Tucson, Arizona

Tucson, Arizona
City of Tucson
Clockwise, from the top: Downtown Tucson skyline, Old Main, University of Arizona, St. Augustine Cathedral, Santa Catalina Mountains, Saguaro National Park, Pima County Courthouse
Flag of Tucson, Arizona
Flag
Etymology: O'odham Cuk Ṣon [tʃʊk ʂɔːn], "(at the) base of the black [hill]"
Nicknames: 
"The Old Pueblo", "Optics Valley", "America's biggest small town"
Interactive map outlining Tucson
Location within Pima County
Location within Pima County
Tucson is located in Arizona
Tucson
Tucson
Location within Arizona
Tucson is located in the United States
Tucson
Tucson
Location within the United States
Coordinates: 32°13′18″N 110°55′35″W / 32.22167°N 110.92639°W / 32.22167; -110.92639Coordinates: 32°13′18″N 110°55′35″W / 32.22167°N 110.92639°W / 32.22167; -110.92639
CountryUnited States
StateArizona
CountyPima
FoundedAugust 20, 1775
IncorporatedFebruary 7, 1877[1]
Founded byHugo O'Conor
Ward
Government
 • TypeCouncil-manager government
 • BodyTucson City Council
 • MayorRegina Romero (D)
 • Vice MayorPaul Cunningham
 • City ManagerMichael Ortega
 • City Council
List
Area
 • City240.79 sq mi (623.65 km2)
 • Land240.48 sq mi (622.83 km2)
 • Water0.32 sq mi (0.82 km2)
Elevation
2,389 ft (728 m)
Population
 • City520,116
 • Estimate 
(2019)[4]
548,073
 • RankUS: 33rd
 • Density2,279.12/sq mi (879.97/km2)
 • Urban
843,168 (52nd)
 • Metro
1,010,025 (58th)
 • Demonym
Tucsonian; Tucsonan
Time zoneUTC-07:00 (MST (no DST))
ZIP Codes
85701-85775
Area code520
FIPS code04-77000
GNIS feature ID43534[5]
Websitetucsonaz.gov
1 Urban = 2010 Census
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Tucson (/ˈtsɑːn, tˈsɑːn/; Spanish: Tucsón; O'odham: Cuk-Ṣon; Navajo: Tó Oostsʼąʼ) is a city in and the county seat of Pima County, Arizona, United States,[6] and is home to the University of Arizona. It is the second largest city in Arizona, with a population of 520,116 in the 2010 United States Census,[3] while the 2015 estimated population of the entire Tucson metropolitan statistical area (MSA) was 980,263.[7] The Tucson MSA forms part of the larger Tucson-Nogales combined statistical area (CSA), with a total population of 1,010,025 as of the 2010 Census. Tucson is the second most-populated city in Arizona behind Phoenix, both of which anchor the Arizona Sun Corridor. The city is 108 miles (174 km) southeast of Phoenix and 60 mi (97 km) north of the U.S.–Mexico border.[6] Tucson is the 33rd largest city and the 58th largest metropolitan area in the United States (2014).

Major incorporated suburbs of Tucson include Oro Valley and Marana northwest of the city, Sahuarita[8] south of the city, and South Tucson in an enclave south of downtown. Communities in the vicinity of Tucson (some within or overlapping the city limits) include Casas Adobes, Catalina Foothills, Flowing Wells, Midvale Park, Tanque Verde, Tortolita, and Vail. Towns outside the Tucson metro area include Benson to the southeast, Catalina and Oracle to the north, and Green Valley to the south.

Tucson was founded as a military fort by the Spanish when Hugo O'Conor authorized the construction of Presidio San Agustín del Tucsón in 1775. It was included in the state of Sonora after Mexico gained independence from the Spanish Empire in 1821. In 1853, the United States acquired a 29,670 square miles (76,840 km2) region of present-day southern Arizona and southwestern New Mexico from Mexico under the Gadsden Purchase.[9] Tucson served as the capital of the Arizona Territory from 1867 to 1877.[10] Tucson was Arizona's largest city by population during the territorial period and early statehood, until it was surpassed by Phoenix by 1920. Nevertheless, population growth remained strong during the late 20th century. In 2017, Tucson was the first American city to be designated a "City of Gastronomy" by UNESCO.[11]

The Spanish name of the city, Tucsón [tukˈson], is derived from the O'odham Cuk Ṣon [tʃʊk ʂɔːn], meaning "(at the) base of the black [hill]", a reference to a basalt-covered hill now known as Sentinel Peak. Tucson is sometimes referred to as "The Old Pueblo".

  1. ^ "Annexations | Official website of the City of Tucson". Tucsonaz.gov. Archived from the original on March 27, 2017. Retrieved April 21, 2017.
  2. ^ "2019 U.S. Gazetteer Files". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved June 30, 2020.
  3. ^ a b "U.S. Census website". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved May 25, 2018.
  4. ^ Cite error: The named reference USCensusEst2019 was invoked but never defined (see the help page).
  5. ^ "Tucson". Geographic Names Information System. United States Geological Survey.
  6. ^ a b "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Archived from the original on May 31, 2011. Retrieved June 7, 2011.
  7. ^ "Metropolitan and Micropolitan Statistical Areas". Qedfinancialsystems.com. Archived from the original on February 10, 2018. Retrieved February 8, 2018.
  8. ^ "David Leighton,"Street Smarts: Sahuarita's name may be misspelling", Arizona Daily Star, February 8, 2016". Archived from the original on February 10, 2016. Retrieved February 14, 2016.
  9. ^ "Gadsden Purchase Treaty". National Archives. August 15, 2016. Retrieved February 27, 2020.
  10. ^ "Capitals of the Arizona Territory". www.library.pima.gov. Retrieved February 27, 2020.
  11. ^ "Tucson Named First UNESCO City of Gastronomy in the USA". Visit Tucson. Archived from the original on June 20, 2019. Retrieved June 14, 2019.