Venus flytrap

Venus flytrap
Venus Flytrap showing trigger hairs.jpg
Leaf
Scientific classification edit
Kingdom: Plantae
Clade: Tracheophytes
Clade: Angiosperms
Clade: Eudicots
Order: Caryophyllales
Family: Droseraceae
Genus: Dionaea
Sol. ex J.Ellis 1768
Species:
D. muscipula
Binomial name
Dionaea muscipula
J.Ellis
Dionaea distribution (revised).svg
Distribution
Synonyms[2]
  • Dionea Raf., spelling variant
  • Dionaea corymbosa
    (Raf.) Steud. (1840)
  • Dionaea crinita
    Sol. (1990) as synonym
  • Dionaea dentata
    D'Amato (1998) name published without description
  • Dionaea heterodoxa
    D'Amato (1998) nom.nud.
  • Dionaea muscicapa
    St.Hil. (1824) sphalm.typogr.
  • Dionaea sensitiva
    Salisb. (1796)
  • Dionaea sessiliflora
    (Raf.) Steud. (1840)
  • Dionaea uniflora
    (Raf.) Steud. (1840)
  • Drosera corymbosa
    Raf. (1833)
  • Drosera sessiliflora
    Raf. (1833)
  • Drosera uniflora
    Raf. (1833)

The Venus flytrap (Dionaea muscipula) is a carnivorous plant native to subtropical wetlands on the East Coast of the United States in North Carolina and South Carolina.[3] It catches its prey—chiefly insects and arachnids—with a trapping structure formed by the terminal portion of each of the plant's leaves, which is triggered by tiny hairs (called "trigger hairs" or "sensitive hairs") on their inner surfaces.

When an insect or spider crawling along the leaves contacts a hair, the trap prepares to close, snapping shut only if another contact occurs within approximately twenty seconds of the first strike. Triggers may occur if one-tenth of the insect is within contact.[4] The requirement of redundant triggering in this mechanism serves as a safeguard against wasting energy by trapping objects with no nutritional value, and the plant will only begin digestion after five more stimuli to ensure it has caught a live bug worthy of consumption.

Dionaea is a monotypic genus closely related to the waterwheel plant (Aldrovanda vesiculosa) and sundews (Drosera), all of which belong to the family Droseraceae.

Although widely cultivated for sale, the population of the Venus flytrap has been rapidly declining in its native range.[5] The species is currently under Endangered Species Act review by the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service.[6]

  1. ^ Schnell, D.; Catling, P.; Folkerts, G.; Frost, C.; Gardner, R.; et al. (2000). "Dionaea muscipula". IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. 2000: e.T39636A10253384. doi:10.2305/IUCN.UK.2000.RLTS.T39636A10253384.en. Listed as Vulnerable (VU A1acd, B1+2c v2.3)
  2. ^ Schlauer, J. (N.d.) Dionaea muscipula. Carnivorous Plant Database.
  3. ^ Kew World Checklist of Selected Plant Families
  4. ^ Sumner, Thomas (20 November 2012). "Investigating the Venus Flytrap". insidescience.com. Retrieved 18 March 2018.
  5. ^ Cite error: The named reference :0 was invoked but never defined (see the help page).
  6. ^ "Venus Flytrap: Under Endangered Species Act review" (PDF). U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service. June 2017. Retrieved 15 December 2019.