Telehealth

Telehealth

Telehealth is the distribution of health-related services and information via electronic information and telecommunication technologies.[1] It allows long-distance patient and clinician contact, care, advice, reminders, education, intervention, monitoring, and remote admissions.[2][3] Telemedicine is sometimes used as a synonym, or is used in a more limited sense to describe remote clinical services, such as diagnosis and monitoring. When rural settings, lack of transport, a lack of mobility, decreased funding, or a lack of staff restrict access to care, telehealth may bridge the gap.[4] as well as provider distance-learning; meetings, supervision, and presentations between practitioners; online information and health data management and healthcare system integration.[5] Telehealth could include two clinicians discussing a case over video conference; a robotic surgery occurring through remote access; physical therapy done via digital monitoring instruments, live feed and application combinations; tests being forwarded between facilities for interpretation by a higher specialist; home monitoring through continuous sending of patient health data; client to practitioner online conference; or even videophone interpretation during a consult.[1][2][5]

  1. ^ a b "TeleHealth". The Health Resources and Services Administration. 2017-04-28.
  2. ^ a b Shaw DK (June 2009). "Overview of telehealth and its application to cardiopulmonary physical therapy". Cardiopulmonary Physical Therapy Journal. 20 (2): 13–8. doi:10.1097/01823246-200920020-00003. PMC 2845264. PMID 20467533.
  3. ^ Cite error: The named reference CFP was invoked but never defined (see the help page).
  4. ^ Mashima PA, Doarn CR (December 2008). "Overview of telehealth activities in speech-language pathology". Telemedicine Journal and E-Health. 14 (10): 1101–17. doi:10.1089/tmj.2008.0080. PMID 19119834.
  5. ^ a b Miller EA (July 2007). "Solving the disjuncture between research and practice: telehealth trends in the 21st century". Health Policy. 82 (2): 133–41. doi:10.1016/j.healthpol.2006.09.011. PMID 17046097.