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Doan Outlaws

Doan Gang
Doan3.jpg
No known portraits of the Doan brothers from life exist but only from woodcut images. Woodcut of Abraham Doan, as recorded as "One of the Doans shooting a British officer", from The Pennsylvania New Jersey Delaware Almanac 1849 and also, Annals of the Revolution; or, a History of the Doans.
Founded byMoses Doan
Founding locationPlumstead, Bucks County, Province of Pennsylvania, British North America, British Empire, present-day Plumstead Township, Bucks County, Pennsylvania, US
Years active1774-1783
TerritoryBucks County, Province of Pennsylvania to Province of New York, British North America, British Empire
EthnicityAmerican
Membership (est.)6
Criminal activitieshorse theft, highway robbery, murder
The Annals of the Revolution; or, a History of the Doans was a popular 19th-century account of the Doans Gang that contributed to their folklore in the form of a dime novel.
"Second attack upon the Smiths" from Annals of the Revolution; or, a History of the Doans
"Brutal conduct of the Doans and Foxy Joe" from Annals of the Revolution; or, a History of the Doans
"Death of Major Kennedy and Moses Doan" from Annals of the Revolution; or, a History of the Doans

The Doan Outlaws, also known as the "Doan Boys" and "Plumstead Cowboys", were a notorious gang of brothers from a Quaker family most renowned for being British spies during the American Revolutionary War.

The Doans were Loyalists from a Quaker family of good standing. The "Doan Boys" reached manhood at the time of the American Revolutionary War. Growing up in Plumstead, Pennsylvania, the Doans excelled athletically. The Doan gang's principal occupation was robbing Whig tax collectors and horse theft. The gang stole over 200 horses from their neighbors in Bucks County that they sold to the Red Coats in Philadelphia and Baltimore. The Friends Meeting House's cemetery in Plumsteadville is protected by a field stone wall that runs around its perimeter. Levi and Abraham Doan were buried just outside this wall because the pacifist Quakers refused to bury militants within their graveyard (a veteran of the Civil War is likewise buried outside the graveyard perimeter). The graves are adorned with their original native brownstone headstones which bear no inscriptions, following the Quaker practice at the time of their death, as well as newer headstones that identify them as outlaws.