Austin, Texas

Austin, Texas
City of Austin
Official seal of Austin, Texas
Seal
Nicknames: 
Live Music Capital of the World, Silicon Hills, ATX, City of the Violet Crown
Motto(s): 
Keep Austin Weird (unofficial)
Location within Travis County in Texas
Location within Travis County in Texas
Austin is located in Texas
Austin
Austin
Location within Texas
Austin is located in the United States
Austin
Austin
Location within the United States
Austin is located in North America
Austin
Austin
Location within North America
Coordinates: 30°16′2″N 97°44′35″W / 30.26722°N 97.74306°W / 30.26722; -97.74306Coordinates: 30°16′2″N 97°44′35″W / 30.26722°N 97.74306°W / 30.26722; -97.74306
Country United States
State Texas
CountiesTravis, Hays, Williamson
Settled1835
IncorporatedDecember 27, 1839
Named forStephen F. Austin
Government
 • TypeCouncil–manager
 • MayorSteve Adler (D)[1][a]
 • City Council
Members
  • Natasha Harper-Madison (D)
  • Vanessa Fuentes (D)
  • Sabino "Pio" Renteria (D)
  • Greg Casar (D)
  • Ann Kitchen (D)
  • Mackenzie Kelly (R)
  • Leslie Pool (D)
  • Paige Ellis (D)
  • Kathie Tovo (D)
  • Alison Alter (D)
 • City managerSpencer Cronk[1]
Area
 • State capital city326.51 sq mi (845.66 km2)
 • Land319.94 sq mi (828.64 km2)
 • Water6.57 sq mi (17.02 km2)
 • Metro
4,285.70 sq mi (11,099.91 km2)
Elevation
289–1,450 ft (88–405 m)
Population
 (2010)
 • State capital city790,390
 • Estimate 
(2019)[3]
978,908
 • Density3,059.68/sq mi (1,181.35/km2)
 • Metro
2,227,083 (29th)
Demonym(s)Austinite
Time zoneUTC−6 (CST)
 • Summer (DST)UTC−5 (CDT)
ZIP Codes
78701–78705, 78708–78739, 78741–78742, 78744–78769
Area codes512 & 737
FIPS code48-05000[4]
GNIS feature ID1384879[5]
Primary AirportAustin–Bergstrom International Airport
InterstatesI-35 (TX).svg
U.S. RouteUS 183.svg US 290.svg
Commuter RailCapital MetroRail
Websiteaustintexas.gov

Austin (US: /ˈɔːstən/, UK: /ˈɒstɪn, ˈɔːstɪn/)[6] is the capital city of the U.S. state of Texas, as well as the seat and largest city of Travis County, with portions extending into Hays and Williamson counties. Incorporated on December 27, 1839, it is the 11th-most populous city in the United States,[7] the fourth-most-populous city in Texas, and the second-most-populous state capital city (after Phoenix, Arizona).[8][9] It was also the fastest growing large city in the United States in 2015 and 2016.[10][11] It is the southernmost state capital in the contiguous United States and is considered a "Beta −" global city as categorized by the Globalization and World Cities Research Network.[12]

As of the U.S. Census Bureau's July 1, 2019 estimate, Austin had a population of 978,908,[13] up from 790,491 at the 2010 census.[4] The city is the cultural and economic center of the Austin–Round Rock metropolitan statistical area, which had an estimated population of 2,227,083 as of July 1, 2019, nearly an 80% increase from the year 2000.[14] Located in Central Texas within the greater Texas Hill Country, it is home to numerous lakes, rivers, and waterways, including Lady Bird Lake and Lake Travis on the Colorado River, Barton Springs, McKinney Falls, and Lake Walter E. Long.

Residents of Austin are known as Austinites.[15] They include a diverse mix of government employees, college students, musicians, high-tech workers, and blue-collar workers. The city's official slogan promotes Austin as "The Live Music Capital of the World", a reference to the city's many musicians and live music venues, as well as the long-running PBS TV concert series Austin City Limits.[16][17] The city also adopted "Silicon Hills" as a nickname in the 1990s due to a rapid influx of technology and development companies. In recent years, some Austinites have adopted the unofficial slogan "Keep Austin Weird",[18] which refers to the desire to protect small, unique, and local businesses from being overrun by large corporations.[19] Since the late 19th century, Austin has also been known as the "City of the Violet Crown", because of the colorful glow of light across the hills just after sunset.[20]

In 1987 Austin originated and remains the site for South by Southwest (stylized as SXSW and colloquially referred to as South By), an annual conglomeration of parallel film, interactive media, and music festivals and conferences that take place in mid-March.

Emerging from a strong economic focus on government and education, since the 1990s Austin has become a center for technology and business.[21][22] A number of Fortune 500 companies have headquarters or regional offices in Austin, including 3M, Advanced Micro Devices (AMD), Amazon, Apple, Facebook, Google, IBM, Intel, Oracle, Texas Instruments, and Whole Foods Market. Dell's worldwide headquarters is located in the nearby suburb of Round Rock.[23] With regard to education, Austin is the home of the University of Texas at Austin, which is one of the largest universities in the U.S. and is attended by over 50,000 students.[24]

  1. ^ a b Cite error: The named reference CityGovernment was invoked but never defined (see the help page).
  2. ^ "2019 U.S. Gazetteer Files". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved August 7, 2020.
  3. ^ Cite error: The named reference USCensusEst2019 was invoked but never defined (see the help page).
  4. ^ a b Cite error: The named reference Census 2010 was invoked but never defined (see the help page).
  5. ^ "Austin, Texas". Geographic Names Information System. United States Geological Survey.
  6. ^ Cite error: The named reference LPD-3 was invoked but never defined (see the help page).
  7. ^ "Endorsement: Prop A's Project Connect is a steep but overdue investment". Austin American-Statesman. October 7, 2020. Retrieved October 13, 2020.
  8. ^ "Top 50 Cities in the U.S. by Population and Rank". infoplease.com. Retrieved January 27, 2014.
  9. ^ "City of Austin - Austin History Center: When was Austin founded?". www.austinlibrary.com.
  10. ^ Weissmann, Jordan (May 21, 2015). "Population growth in U.S. cities: Austin is blowing away the competition". Slate.
  11. ^ "America's Fastest Growing Cities 2016". Forbes. January 14, 2017.
  12. ^ "The World According to GaWC 2020". lboro.ac.uk. Globalization and World Cities Research Network. Retrieved March 5, 2021.
  13. ^ "QuickFacts -- Austin, Texas". U.S. Census Bureau. Retrieved June 8, 2019.
  14. ^ Castillo, Juan. "Old story, new chapter: Austin leads U.S. in growth among biggest metro areas". Austin American-Statesman. Retrieved December 14, 2020.
  15. ^ Weird City. University of Texas Press. May 1, 2010. ISBN 9780292778153. Archived from the original on May 9, 2013. Retrieved April 23, 2013.
  16. ^ Cite error: The named reference motto was invoked but never defined (see the help page).
  17. ^ Cite error: The named reference atx_motto was invoked but never defined (see the help page).
  18. ^ "MetroSeeker.com". MetroSeeker.com. Archived from the original on November 20, 2011. Retrieved November 16, 2011.
  19. ^ Cite error: The named reference weird was invoked but never defined (see the help page).
  20. ^ "Just what is a violet crown?". Retrieved August 19, 2016.
  21. ^ "Brief History of Austin". Austin Public Library.
  22. ^ Cite error: The named reference austin history was invoked but never defined (see the help page).
  23. ^ Canales, Katie (July 6, 2019). "Silicon Valley tech talent is flocking to Austin, Texas, trading sky-high rent costs for live music and a newer tech scene — here's what it's like in 'Silicon Hills'". Business Insider. Retrieved January 15, 2020.
  24. ^ "University of Texas at Austin". U.S. News and World Report - Best Colleges Ranking.


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