Ambrose


Ambrose of Milan
Bishop of Milan
Polittico dei santi cosma e damiano (paolo veneziano) sant'ambrogio.jpg
Portrait by Paolo Veneziano in 14th century
ChurchLatin Church
DioceseMediolanum (Milan)
SeeMediolanum
Installed374 AD
Term ended4 April 397
PredecessorAuxentius
SuccessorSimplician
Orders
Consecration7 December 374
Personal details
Birth nameAurelius Ambrosius
Bornc. 340
Augusta Treverorum, Gallia Belgica, Roman Empire (modern-day Trier, Germany)
Died4 April 397(397-04-04) (aged 56–57)
Mediolanum, Italia, Roman Empire (modern-day Milan, Italy)
NationalityRoman
DenominationLatin-Rite Catholic
Children
Theology career
Notable work
Veni redemptor gentium
Theological work
EraPatristic Age
Tradition or movementTrinitarianism
Main interestsMariology
Notable ideasFilioque,[1] anti-paganism, mother of the Church[2]
Sainthood
Feast dayDecember 7
Venerated in
Title as SaintDoctor of the Church
AttributesPontifical vestments
PatronageBee keepers, bees, bishops, candle makers, domestic animals, French Commissariat, geese, learning, livestock, Milan, police officers, students, wax refiners
ShrinesBasilica of Sant'Ambrogio

Ambrose of Milan (born Aurelius Ambrosius; c. 340 – 397), venerated as Saint Ambrose,[a] was the Bishop of Milan, a theologian, and one of the most influential ecclesiastical figures of the 4th century.

Ambrose was serving as the Roman governor of Aemilia-Liguria in Milan when he was unexpectedly made Bishop of Milan in 374 by popular acclamation. As bishop, he took a firm position against Arianism and attempted to mediate the conflict between the emperor Theodosius I and the usurper Magnus Maximus. Tradition credits Ambrose with promoting "antiphonal chant", a style of chanting in which one side of the choir responds alternately to the other, as well as with composing Veni redemptor gentium, an Advent hymn. He also had notable influence on Augustine of Hippo (354-430).

Western Christianity identified Ambrose as one of its four traditional Doctors of the Church. He is considered a saint by the Catholic Church, Eastern Orthodox Church, Anglican Communion, and various Lutheran denominations, and venerated as the patron saint of Milan.


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